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Two Chinese companies, Huawei and ZTE, are running into opposition from the US Government over concerns that their smartphones and supporting services are providing the Chinese government with a surveillance capability that poses a national security risk. Other countries are also concerned with both Australia and India investigating the phones.

 

US intelligence agencies have urged the American Congress to pass legislation banning the use of products or services from either company by US Government Agencies. A bill has been introduced for this purpose. The bill asserts that companies like Huawei and ZTE are,

 

“directly subject to direction by the Chinese Communist Party, to include support for PRC state policies and goals.’’

 

In other words, these phones and services provide the perfect platform for stealing data and monitoring communications, funneling it all back to the Chinese government. In an article from The Verge, a cybersecurity author is cited as saying,

 

“there is a growing cybersecurity risk as complicated hardware supply chains harbor plenty of opportunities for foreign agents to compromise equipment.”

 

What the threat is exactly is not being discussed, a typical practice with intelligence operations around the world. They don’t want the opposition to know what they know. Even so, an article from ChannelNews in late 2016 reported that phones manufactured by both companies were found to have code embedded in their software that sends data to a Chinese server, without the users knowledge or permission, every 72 hours. This includes full text message contents, contact information, and telephone logs.

 

An additional concern is that a backdoor might exist that could allow a remote user to bypass the telephone’s security and use the device for covert surveillance. When you think of the spy game, governments stealing each other’s secrets comes to mind first. However, industrial espionage is also a serious concern. These phones could be used to steal important corporate information, allowing foreign governments to improve their products without expending the development effort.

 

The earlier quite about complicated hardware supply chains creating the opportunity for some bad actor to insert malicious code or vulnerabilities is the reason that CRIP.TO directly manages all aspects of the production and assembly of the Black device right here in Europe. Plus using a FPGA chip prevents the introduction of spyware or other hacks since the chip has no capability until a CRIP.TO employee installs the firmware.

 

CRIP.TO is dedicated to protecting the privacy, anonymity, and data of our users so they don’t have to make the choice Tweeted by Kim DotCom below:

 

“All smartphones have spy backdoors these days. But if you live outside China buy a phone from Huawei and use encrypted communication apps. That way it’s the Chinese spying on you and they don’t share your data with the US/EU spy agencies.”All phones have spy backdoors these days. But if you live outside of China buy a phone from Huawei and use encrypted communication apps. That way it’s the Chinese spying on you and they don’t share your data with US / EU spy agencies 😎All phones have spy backdoors these days. But if you live outside of China buy a phone from Huawei and use encrypted communication apps. That way it’s the Chinese spying on you and they don’t share your data with US / EU spy agencies 😎

 

With the CRIP.TO solution, any Android device will give you the freedom to communicate fearlessly. Find out more at our website today.

 

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About CRIP.TO

We envision a world where all digital communications are safe and private. We are dedicated to creating innovative best-in-class solutions that protect data exchange with the highest level of security and privacy.

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