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A recent article asked this question in a survey and came away with an unsettling discovery, most people simply do not care enough to take measures to protect themselves, their identity, and their data when online or using their cellular devices. Or they think it will not happen to them.

2017 demonstrated what can happen when big data companies and organizations suffer hacks. Equifax, Uber, and Yahoo grabbed the headlines, but attacks also revealed information about millions of American government employees, military personnel, and voter records. FedEx, Verizon, and Netflix also suffered from attacks on their systems.

Software powers our modern world. It makes many things so much easier. Still, as programs become more complex to add enhanced features, the inevitable flaw or “exploit” in security terms is bound to be introduced. An exploit isn’t something that prevents the software from doing the job it is designed to do. Rather, it is an avenue into the software that hackers discover. 

When it comes to our personal information, a common feeling is that, “No one is interested in me and my information.” Of course we know that does not apply to financial information but a recent article in The Register spells out exactly how much our information is worth to those with bad intents towards using it.

According to findings by Kaspersky, as reported in Security Week, the number of malware attacks on mobile devices running the Android operating system (OS) increased considerably in 2017. Popular attacks included banking Trojans, ransomware Trojans, and various other attempts to direct users to malicious sites or give up personal and financial information.

A common question here at CRIP.TO is, "Why did you decide to avoid NIST approved algorithms like SHA256 or AES when you built your solution?"

The answer is simple, these encryption methodologies could be issued with vulnerabilities built in that could compromise them, the information they protect, and the identity of the user in the future. The National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) is a US agency. So it makes sense for other US agencies to encourage the use of encryption they know how to compromise.

 

CRIP.TO mentioned in the Huffington Post!

Our solution is being noticed in the USA! Hopefully more and more people will start realizing the importance of true encryption in communications

You can read the whole article at this link: huffingtonpost.com/possibilities-of-blockchain-technology

 

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About CRIP.TO

We envision a world where all digital communications are safe and private. We are dedicated to creating innovative best-in-class solutions that protect data exchange with the highest level of security and privacy.

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